1976 BMW R-Series

1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series
1976 BMW R-Series

1976 BMW R-Series

This is the model that won Daytona and put BMW Motorcycles back on the map! I have decided to thin the herd a bit. I will be sad to see this one go, but I currently own a R75/5, and R90S and a R100 as well as 3 other BMWs of various ages.

It is remarkable to compare these three bikes side by side and witness their evolution through the seat of one's pants. I simply have too many bikes, and I don't give them the attention they deserve. I also have my eye on a Moto Guzzi, and simply need to make room. I would rather turn this over to someone who will continue to appreciate and RIDE it.

If you are reading this ad, you know that in most Airhead circles, this bike (and maybe an early 80s G/S) are the most highly sought bikes an Airhead collector could add to their collection. Prices are going up 10% per year, and this one needs nothing while you enjoy it. It has over 100k miles on it. But it starts, stops and rides like a champ, and is probably the most enjoyable of my 70s Airheads.

I would not hesitate to fly and ride it if you catch some good Colorado weather it can be done! If you are looking for a winter project, there are some things you can do to familiarize yourself with the bike without tearing anything down too far. Has been garaged 100% of the time it has not been on the road, and registered in dry, sunny Colorado its entire life.

This bike was built for the US market in September 1975, and is registered as a 1976. I bought this bike from the second owner a couple of years ago. He owned it since 1979, and put over 100,000 miles on it while keeping meticulous maintenance records. It has about 103,700 miles now, and it's a strong, reliable ride. It has some condition issues in its original paint work from the leather tank bag he toured with.

That bag is induced with the sale. It also has a small dent on the left side of the tank from when it fell in a trailer 40 years ago. It has new tires, runs like a champ, and is ready for another 100,000 miles. It is dual plugged, and has nearly-new tires. If you are in the market for an R90S, this is probably the least you will pay for one that does not require a lot of work.

If you just want one to ride and enjoy, this is the bike for you. Hit me up and I'll tell you everything you want to know about it.

I have 6 bikes and this one does not get the attention it deserves and I hate to see it sit. She was made to run. The front brakes have just been bled and feel great. The front forks are probably due for a flush.

The left turn signal is sometimes slow to turn on. It's due to a poor ground connection on the front turn signal stalk, and I just haven't fixed it. If you pull backward on the light stalk when it's not blinking, a better ground is made, and it works fine.

The clock runs 1 minute fast per day, and I have not had it recalibrated. I disconnected it so it would not wear the mechanicals while it is parked. I have kept maintenance records since I bought it, and have the records from the 70s that came with the bike.

Engine was a pushrod OHV. The engine was based closely on the R75/5.

Sharing the same stroke, but with a larger bore, to give a capacity of 898cc. The R90S weighed 215 kg (474 lb) and has a five-speed gearbox with a shaft final drive. The first R90S models had a two-tone paintwork scheme of "Smoke Black/Silver" with adhesive gold pinstripes. Feedback from unimpressed customers prompted BMW to return to hand painted pinstripes.

Later R90S models were available also in two-tone "Daytona Orange" with red pinstriping. The R90S had a redesigned seat, with a small "ducktail" fairing which (in addition to an underseat tool tray) provided a small storage space lightweight items such as waterproofs.

Standard equipment included a full toolkit, a hand pump, a first-aid kit and even a small hand towel with an embroidered BMW logo. The R90S had a small bikini fairing which housed two analogue instruments: a clock and a voltmeter. Its 238 watt alternator was later upgraded to 250 watt.

An adjustable hydraulic steering damper. Was manually adjusted via a knob on the steering head. Suspension was by long-travel telescopic forks and twin rear shocks whose rear dampers were adjustable for preload (the only suspension adjustment available). Whereas other BMW boxers had Bing slide constant velocity carburetor. The R90S was fitted with accelerator pump Dell'Orto.

The R90S engine had a 9.5:1 compression ratio, while the less sporty R90/6 had a ratio of 9:1. The alloy wheels were spoked and wore tubed tyres. The front brake had twin 230 mm disks and ATE callipers; the rear brake was a 200 mm SLS. The R90S and the other BMW "/6" series front brakes had an unusual system whereby a master cylinder on the top frame tube was activated by a cable from the front brake lever.

This arrangement was supposed to protect the master cylinder in the event of a crash; but later "/7". Machines adopted a conventional handlebar. There were three series of the R90S. Model year 1974: September 1973 to August 1974 (6,058 units). Model year 1975: June 1974 to September 1975 (6,413 units) - A strengthened crankshaft has a new main bearing to prevent flex.

Model year 1976: August 1975 to June 1976 (4,984 units) - Engine casings are improved in anticipation of the forthcoming R100S. The item "1976 BMW R-Series" is in sale since Monday, December 23, 2019. This item is in the category "eBay Motors\Motorcycles\BMW\R-Series". The seller is "johngaltenterprises" and is located in Denver, Colorado. This item can be shipped worldwide.


1976 BMW R-Series


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